Category Archives: Uncategorized

Rustic Clay Wind Chime

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Rustic Clay Wind Chime

It has been entirely too long between entries.  Life gets like that though I guess. I actually made this wind chime back in May, but have not had a chance to blog about it. Pretty sad when you can’t find a spare half hour in 7 months… but hopefully I will make up for that over the next 3 weeks while my schedule is not so hectic.

I am really happy with the way this project turned out, but it may not be something everyone can make at home, as you will need access to a kiln for the baking of the clay.  I am lucky enough to have that access 🙂  The discs were made from potters clay, available from any good craft shop, about $30 for 10kg (it’s really heavy when wet!). I rolled some clay out to around 5mm thick, then cut the circles out using a metal egg ring.  I then used a variety of leaves and flowers from around the garden, laid them over the clay and rolled over gently with a rolling pin, just enough to create the patterns as you can see.

Clay craft

Clay circles with leaf and flower prints.

Once baked and cooled, it was time for assembly.  Mr 5 and Miss 6 were happy to help decorate the pieces of fishing line with some chunky transparent glass beads I had in my bead stash.

Threading beads

Threading the beads on fishing line before assembly

We then went on a hunt for the perfect stick, attached it to a chair and began assembly.  I wanted the discs to taper down, so this was not something the kids could help with.

Assembly of wind chime

Assembling

Once I was happy with the positioning of each string, I tied them in a few more knots and decorated the top hanging twine.  Cut off any loose ends and it’s done.  As simple as that.

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Each disc touches the next ever so slightly, making a lovely sound in the breeze, without being too noisy.

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Egg Carton Daffodils – School Holidays Craft

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School holidays!  Woot! First cab off the rank, these simple little daffodils made from egg cartons.

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All you need is an egg carton, paint, pipe cleaners or skewers, glue.  I used split pins to attach the centres to the petals, but you could just glue them too.  One carton makes 5 flowers.

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Cut the centres first, as shown above.  Then cut out 5 of the cups to make neat little flowers.  Daffodils technically have more than 4 petals, but I just worked with 4  as the egg cups have a squarish shape and it was easier to cut that way.

Paint the middle sections inside and out.  We used orange, but you could use any colour you like.  Then paint the outers a lighter colour.

Once dry, I poked some holes through the centre of each piece and using pliers inserted a gold split pin (my fingers wouldn’t fit in there, so had to use pliers).

For the stems, pipe cleaners would have been easier, but I decided to use some skewers wrapped in green raffia.  It gave them a more natural texture.  I secured the raffia at each end with some sticky tape.

Then it was simply a case of attaching the stems to the flowers.  I used hot glue for this.

 

DIY Bingo Craft Ideas

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Bingo’s rich history can be traced all the way back to Italy, where a game known as Lotto D’Italia spread in the 1500s. In the late 1770s, the game spread to France, and later, in the 1800s, Germany picked up the format of the Lotto game and turned it into an educational tool, assisting students in learning spelling, history, and maths.

Years later, bingo became a hit in the United States, with hundreds of people regularly attending bingo halls in the 1960s. Today, bingo has become a multi-million industry. In the U.K. alone, the online bingo industry enjoys revenues of $557 million annually, prompting even British supermarket chain Iceland Bingo to launch Bingoiceland.com

Today’s bingo games are a far cry from the games held in Italy and Germany in the 1800s, but they can still be used as a tool to teach children.

If you still have old bingo sites lying around in your house, you can certainly use them to create great arts and crafts that you can use to teach your children different concepts. Here are some ways to make full use of those old bingo sets:

Glittered Wooden Bingo Chips

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Image credit http://igottacreate.blogspot.com

This glitter project for bingo chips that can turn them into push pins for your children’s cork boards. The craft is fairly simple too: Collect all your used wooden bingo chips and apply clear nail polish to the edges. Roll the bingo chips onto the glitter and allow them to dry. Once the glitter and nail polish are no longer sticky to touch, finish the chips off with another coat of nail polish.

Bingo Dauber Easter Bunnies

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Image credit http://kidsactivitiesblog.com

This Easter bunny art craft is an easy project that your kids can make. Give your kids a dauber each and give them a piece of paper to daub. Let them go crazy and daub wherever they like, but make sure they stop before the sheet of paper becomes too crowded. Next, grab some smaller markers and draw the ears, eyes, nose, mouth and limbs to your bunnies. You can use these Easter bunnies themed papers as a gift wrapper or as an Easter card.

Wooden Bingo Chip Charms

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Image credit: April San Pedro

Create a one-of-a-kind charm with bingo chips. For this project, you will need bingo chips, eye hooks, alcohol ink, and jewellery charms. Pre-drill the wooden chips with a 1/32” drill bit. Apply alcohol ink to create a vintage look, then screw the eye hook on the pre-drilled hole. Add jewellery charms like a jade turtle, or a four-leaf clover.

Learning the Alphabet with Bingo Daubers

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Incorporate lessons into playtime with this bingo dauber dot art from DLTK’s Crafts for Kids  The site offers free printable bingo dauber projects. Print out these blank alphabets and let your child unleash their creativity using bingo daubers.

Kids Craft, Easter Egg Sun Catcher / Stained Glass

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Kids Craft, Easter Egg Sun Catcher / Stained Glass

Inspiration for this project came from Alpha Moms blog. I thought I’d adjust it into an Easter themed project, given it is already that time of year.

All you need is some of the whitish milk or juice cartons.  We actually used a cordial bottle for the grass.  The stickers on the milk bottle where quite hard to remove and left a sticky residue.  I managed to remove this with some mineral turpentine.

Once you have your clean pieces of plastic, draw or as we did, trace your shapes using a black permanent marker (Sharpie etc).  Then let the kids colour as desired.  Once coloured, cut away the extra plastic and you’re done!  They turned out even better than expected.

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We attached ours to the windows using double sided tape rather than suction cups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pom Pom Easter Wreath

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Pom Pom Easter Wreath

The girls at All Tizzies Up do love a pom pom or 700!  Here is a simple easter wreath they put together using basic craft materials and a pile of pom poms!

 

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Make Your Own Easter Head Bands

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The girls at All Tizzied Up had a busy weekend doing Easter craft. Their first creations were these cute little hand made head bands.

Mum has taken step by step photos that do all the explaining themselves.

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Cardboard Roll Easter Chicks – Kids Easter Craft.

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Cardboard Roll Easter Chicks – Kids Easter Craft.

I’d like to say I came up with this all on my own, but that would be a lie.  Ms5 and I made some owls inspired by this post from   Kerrys Craft Blog.  It was from this concept that I came up with these easter Chicks.  I thought the fact you can hold eggs or treats in them was ideal for an easter craft project.

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All you need is some coloured paper, cardboard rolls, tape and glue.  You can make them just as cute without the feathers, goggly eyes and pipe cleaners, but if you have some of those handy, you could use them like we did too.   The main difference between these and the owls is that the top and bottom folds are in opposite directions to each other, so the head comes to a peak in the middle rather than making two ears like the owls have.  The rest of the instructions can be found by running your curser over or clicking on the photos below.

 

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